How to fix ex-teacher’s hot issue

Ex-teachers have complained about a hot issue in the education sector – a shortage of teachers.

The shortage, which has been a major concern for the sector, has led to concerns among some employers, and the education industry, about the impact it will have on their employment. 

The Department of Education is offering to provide teacher trainees with more than $50,000 in extra funding to support a “training gap”. 

“Teachers need more than what they are getting today to prepare them for the demands of the workforce,” a spokesperson for Education Minister Christopher Pyne said in a statement.

“The Government will provide additional training opportunities to those in the teaching profession who have an urgent need for additional support.”

Teachers’ unions have criticised the Government for being too tight-lipped about the plan, with the Federation of Independent Teachers saying the Government needs to “come clean” about the shortfall in training and the availability of teachers to teach.

The Government is also considering expanding its online teacher training program to include more teachers and increasing the availability and quality of teaching staff, according to a statement by the Australian Federation of Teachers.

The Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS) has also called for the Government to introduce a national teacher recruitment system, with teachers in remote communities being recruited on a first come, first serve basis.

“If teachers are getting a lower pay rate, they are being pushed into positions that they’re not qualified for,” said ACOSS secretary-general Tim Carmody.

“This is putting pressure on young people’s ability to find work in the economy.”

The Australian Institute of Education (AIE) has said the shortage of skilled teachers will hurt Australia’s workforce, and a shortage is the most pressing issue facing education.

The AIE said that the lack of teachers was impacting on the quality of education in the country, which would “require a change in the way we do business”.

“The shortage of qualified teachers is impacting negatively on students and communities, and is creating significant challenges for our young people,” the AIE wrote in a submission to the Government.

Topics:government-and-politics,education,education-facilities,government-islamic-conflict-and%E2%80%99s-policy,jobs,education—australia”

We are urging the Government, the Australian Education Union, and state and territory governments to do more to address this problem and ensure that schools, employers, educators, and students are receiving the best and most qualified teachers to support their learning needs.”

Topics:government-and-politics,education,education-facilities,government-islamic-conflict-and%E2%80%99s-policy,jobs,education—australia